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T1no

RAnd0m Au7om071v3

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Turvy   

One word: scary

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Jedi2155   

Breaks down a lot....that's why its custom and not engineered.

 

He said he loves the smooth power.....thats how electric is =D. Give it a decade or 2, and we'll have electric cars that can match this =D (not that it can't happen right now, just the battery power/range isn't there yet).

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kuhla   

Walking through the parking lot today and something catches my eye so I stop to look. An unremarkable car with some sexy vredestein tires (you gotta ham up that accent when you say that name for maximal affect). Not practical tires at all but damn they sexy....

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T1no   

shit! vredestein sensata 180 a pop. and they all runflats

which means stiff as f**k

 

my hankook was 130 ish

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T1no   

Posted Image

 

hmm i want to like this car but i cant. the bodykit is just too busy.

 

the base car tho its pretty good.

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kuhla   

http://jalopnik.com/5923802/watch-hackers-...n-three-minutes

 

GG SmartKey System! I wonder if this affects US models as well....

Yes it does and no it isn't entirely the fault of the key system. The location of the data port is the bigger issue. If it were just located somewhere so that it could not be easily reached from a broken window (such as ""door pillar and if the door is shut you can't get to it"") then it wouldn't be a problem. Also there are numerous cars that do not register a glass break to set off the alarm. Also, quite a few cars can be programmed with just a data cable. Lots of people on vwvortex have played around with vagcom, example: http://wiki.ross-tech.com/wiki/index.php/V...1K/5M%29_Tweaks

 

source - http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1703725

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Jedi2155   

The OBD II port is commonly used by diagnostic software during driving, so having in accessible with the door shut is not an acceptable location. I bet placing it there would prevent the use of all existing OBD II devices (as they could be not used during vehicle operation) as well which would highly not be viewed as friendly in the eurozone legislation climate.

 

Putting in the hidden/covered spot within the glove box might be better but it would just mean the assailant would have to crawl through the broken glass window to get to it instead of the normal spot under the steering wheel.

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kuhla   

The OBD II port is commonly used by diagnostic software during driving, so having in accessible with the door shut is not an acceptable location.

The number of people that would need this capability is extremely small. I strongly doubt any car maker is placing the obd port with that usage in mind. Not even mechanics are driving cars around with their laptops plugged into the obd.

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Jedi2155   

Really? I only know from my own limited anecdotal experiences but I've seen a few mechanics do it. I definitely did it all the time, along with the mechanics at my facility.

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Malaphax   

The difference being you guys are testing cars and gathering specific data from them. While the vast majority of mechanics would only have an obd connected device plugged in while the car is idling at most. Keep in mind that the computer systems in cars and everything else will continue to be exploited, this will only get worse, not better. I think the easiest way of changing the situation would be registering window breaks with the alarm. If they can block the locking signal from your keys then they're already doing some pretty serious shit, and you're being very specifically targeted at that point.

 

My other thought is that if the obd access needs to be so blatent, then have the obd not active while the car is off. Also why the hell does the obd need to provide the key's digital ID? They mention mechanics needing access to that information - WHY? I mean if you bring your car to the mechanic you generally give them your keys anyways. That seems patently retarded. Why not, limit access to the digital ID when the key is actually in the car.

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kuhla   

Really? I only know from my own limited anecdotal experiences but I've seen a few mechanics do it. I definitely did it all the time, along with the mechanics at my facility.

Mechanics plugged in to read error codes in the shop? Yes. Driving the car around and logging? No. Please don't compare your work to what is being done in the vast majority of repair shops.

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Jedi2155   

Mechanics plugged in to read error codes in the shop? Yes. Driving the car around and logging? No. Please don't compare your work to what is being done in the vast majority of repair shops.

I had a problem with my Volt and brought it to the shop, he drove it around with a scan tool. I work on at a transportation service depot which services over 5000 light, medium and heavy duty vehicles. The mechanics here use them from time to time. So although I am comparing just what I do, it was only a small part of the consideration.

 

My other thought is that if the obd access needs to be so blatent, then have the obd not active while the car is off. Also why the hell does the obd need to provide the key's digital ID? They mention mechanics needing access to that information - WHY? I mean if you bring your car to the mechanic you generally give them your keys anyways. That seems patently retarded. Why not, limit access to the digital ID when the key is actually in the car.

They are probably sniffing the CAN bus data which is generally unencrypted. A good question is why could they not encrypt the digital ID. I'm wondering if they're merely copying the encrypted signal and replaying it each time back on the CAN bus. My experience with OBD systems is that you generally need to turn on the vehicle to access data.

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kuhla   

I had a problem with my Volt and brought it to the shop, he drove it around with a scan tool. I work on at a transportation service depot which services over 5000 light, medium and heavy duty vehicles. The mechanics here use them from time to time. So although I am comparing just what I do, it was only a small part of the consideration.

While waiting for service, I've never seen a mechanic at the dealerships or private shops my family has brought our cars to over the years take them off the property to drive them around other than moving them from the parking lot into the garage and back out again.

 

If I was sitting in the waiting room and saw a mechanic drive my car off the lot I would demand to know wtf he was doing.

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Jedi2155   

While waiting for service, I've never seen a mechanic at the dealerships or private shops my family has brought our cars to over the years take them off the property to drive them around other than moving them from the parking lot into the garage and back out again.

 

If I was sitting in the waiting room and saw a mechanic drive my car off the lot I would demand to know wtf he was doing.

My dealer was trying to reproduce a check engine light I got my first day. They could not get any codes which was why they were trying to do that. It only happened twice, and never came back. I bet it was a just a cell voltage imbalance across the modules due to it sitting on the lot for a while. It self corrected after using the vehicle for a while. I haven't seen it since.

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T1no   

a good OBD should log all that stuff. not able to get a code from previous events kinda defeat the purpose no ? LOL

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Jedi2155   

The CEL only flashed for a little bit, and it didn't save on the buffer. Sometimes though you do need to drive to see the conditions, not all the time but sometimes. There is a lot of data on the CAN bus, but a OBD usually only saves the codes like a snapshot. To save all the data going through the can bus, you're talking about gigabytes of data every few hours.

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