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kuhla

If you've got nothing to hide, you've got nothing to fear.

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Facebook hired a new general council - Jennifer Newstead.  Her previous credentials include: Drafting the patriot act in 2001, and she was previously the top legal adviser to Trump's state department. 

While I'm not normally one to engage with sensationalist headlines I will provide a few quotes. 

Quote

CNN:  F**k Privacy. Facebook’s Terrifying New Lawyer is an Architect of NSA Mass Surveillance

Washington Post:  She sold the Patriot Act to Congress. Her next job is defending Facebook.

The Hill:  Facebook taps lawyer who helped write Patriot Act as new general counsel

Politico:  Why Facebook hired a Patriot Act author and privacy activist

Link to Google News aggregator: https://news.google.com/stories/CAAqSQgKIkNDQklTTERvSmMzUnZjbmt0TXpZd1NoOGFIV1JxUmpWWVVIVkJSM1JTTms4dFRTMWFNMGRmZW5wSWExVnhVMkpOS0FBUAE

I suspect Facebook is hoping that Ms. Newstead will help them deal with various intelligence agency requests as well as buy them political capital with the Republican party and the current administration.  I also suspect that this will at best be a short-term solution and further signal the utter contempt Facebook has for any sort of user privacy protection. 

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translated article - https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.spiegel.de%2Fnetzwelt%2Fnetzpolitik%2Fhorst-seehofer-will-messengerdienste-zum-entschluesseln-zwingen-a-1269121.html

Germany

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Federal Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) wants to give security authorities access to standard end-to-end encrypted chats and telephone calls. Messenger services such as WhatsApp or Telegram should be obliged to record the communications of their customers and to send them to authorities - in a readable form, ie unencrypted. As the SPIEGEL reports in its current issue, providers who do not fulfill this obligation should be banned by order of the Federal Network Agency for Germany. ( Read the whole story at SPIEGEL + here. )

Encryption is a crime.

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article - https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/give-your-password-or-go-jail-police-push-legal-boundaries-n1014266

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....

Five days later, after Montanez was bailed out of jail, a deputy from the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office tracked him down, handed him the warrants and demanded the phone passcodes. Again, Montanez refused. Prosecutors went to a judge, who ordered him locked up again for contempt of court.

“I felt like they were violating me. They can’t do that,” Montanez, 25, recalled recently. "F--- y’all. I ain’t done nothing wrong. They wanted to get in the phone for what?”

He paid a steep price, spending 44 days behind bars before the THC and gun charges were dropped, the contempt order got tossed and he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor pot charge.
.....

 

Another one of these cases.

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article - https://apnews.com/7423e1ef65a144e6a47e4da63683b3c1

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NEW YORK (AP) — Attorney General William Barr said Tuesday that increased encryption of data on phones and computers and encrypted messaging apps are putting American security at risk.

Barr’s comments at a cybersecurity conference mark a continuing effort by the Justice Department to push tech companies to provide law enforcement with access to encrypted devices and applications during investigations.

“There have been enough dogmatic pronouncements that lawful access simply cannot be done,” Barr said. “It can be, and it must be.”

The attorney general said law enforcement is increasingly unable to access information on devices, and between devices, even with a warrant supporting probable cause of criminal activity.

......

 

Encryption is a crime.

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article - https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/mb88za/amazon-requires-police-to-shill-surveillance-cameras-in-secret-agreement

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Amazon's home security company Ring has enlisted local police departments around the country to advertise its surveillance cameras in exchange for free Ring products and a “portal” that allows police to request footage from these cameras, a secret agreement obtained by Motherboard shows. The agreement also requires police to “keep the terms of this program confidential.” 
....

article - https://abc7.com/news/lapd-pilot-program-uses-smartphone-app-to-reduce-burglaries/1262052/

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WILSHIRE PARK, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The Los Angeles Police Department has partnered with a tech company to provide free doorbell cameras to homeowners in an effort to reduce burglaries.

The Santa Monica-based company Ring donated 500 of its video doorbells to neighborhoods in the Wilshire Park and Country Club Park communities of Los Angeles.
....

 

Not sure how I feel about this. Still digesting it.

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Yea it's one thing for police being able to request video from the owners of the home, it's another when they can secretly request data directly from ring without consulting the owners.  One security specialist said that this was akin to Amazon (owners of Ring) and the police departments created a decentralized surveillance network - which I think is hyperbole but not entirely untrue. 
Remember Amazon also tried rolling out their smart lock/camera pair that would allow deliveries to open your front door.  Of course the security on that was laughable, but I wouldn't be surprised if at some point they try to use facial recognition on a ring doorbell combined with a smart lock to do roughly the same thing with "added security."  The proliferation of facial recognition and biometric scraping it another issue entirely and genuinely terrifying. 

Recently some states have started cracking down on "porch pirates" and other theft of packages, upping the charges from simple misdemeanors to felonies.  That shows the trends some people are concerned about.
I think home surveillance is something people should invest in, but I disagree wholeheartedly with the idea of police being able to access that data without express consent from the homeowners. 

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i think im on the same boat with malaphax "I disagree wholeheartedly with the idea of police being able to access that data without express consent from the homeowners. "

i dont think ive lost  a package before but im waiting for wyze to release outdoor camera so i can put one in the front door.

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It's a long read (56 pages) but if you are curious what the US Department of Defense officially encourages for "identity and privacy protection" as of March 2019, then here it is (note the URL). They have sections on a lot of different topics, OSs, services, etc. Many sections encourage using encryption.

https://www.arcyber.army.mil/Portals/34/Fact Sheets/DoD_Identity_Awareness_Protection_Management_Guide_March2019.pdf?ver=2019-06-24-174833-227
 

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article - https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/10/04/us_government_encryption/

I'm practically quoting the entire article but to save you a click....

Quote

 

The US government is renewing its efforts to talk tech firms out of using end-to-end encryption methods that would keep police from snooping on conversations.

The Department of Justice on Friday held what it dubbed the "Lawful Access Summit," a morning-long presentation aimed at convincing people that police must be able to see all conversations on messaging platforms in order to protect the public, specifically children, from predators.

"Outside the digital world, none of us would accept the proposition that grown-ups should be permitted to mingle in closed rooms with children they don’t know in order to groom them for sexual exploitation," offered US deputy attorney general Jeffrey Rosen.

"Neither would we ever accept the idea that a person should be allowed to keep a hoard of child sexual abuse material from the scrutiny of the justice system when all of society’s traditional procedures for protecting the person’s privacy, like the Fourth Amendment’s warrant requirement, have been satisfied. But in the digital world, that is increasingly the situation in which we find ourselves."

In particular, the DOJ has zeroed in on Facebook. The social network recently announced its intention to make all of its chat services, not just WhatsApp, end-to-end encrypted platforms that will place keys in the hands of the users themselves.

"We must find a way to balance the need to secure data with public safety and the need for law enforcement to access the information they need to safeguard the public, investigate crimes, and prevent future criminal activity," the DOJ says to the social network.

"Not doing so hinders our law enforcement agencies’ ability to stop criminals and abusers in their tracks."

Rather than demand the backdoor ability to decrypt communications on demand, the DOJ is suggesting tech firms instead offer a "front door" to let police present a warrant and receive copies of the conversations they wish to view. Unfortunately, the authorities don't seem to have any idea what that "front door" would actually look like in the context of an end-to-end encrypted service.
....

 

Think of the children.

Encryption is a crime.

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